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CrashPlan Review

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CrashPlan at a Glance

Your Rating

Rate CrashPlan

3.74 avg. rating (74% score) - 93 votes

Our Rating

3.75 / 5 stars
★★★¾☆ 

Price:

  • Individual Unlimited: $5.99/month, $59.99/year, $114.99/two years, $189.99/four years
  • Family Plan Unlimited: $13.99/month, $149.99/year, $289.99/two years, $429.99/four years

Pros:

  • Runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux
  • Local backup
  • Unlimited file size
  • Locked file backup
  • Backup email reports
  • Seeded backup
  • Mobile apps now available
  • Deleted files can be retrieved indefinitely
  • Backup external drives
  • Ability to create backup sets

Cons:

  • Options can be confusing
  • No Sharing
  • No virtual drive
  • Requires Java to run
  • High memory usage often gets in the way of regular computer use
  • Backup can be slow and speed can degrade over time
  • No two-factor authentication

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Full CrashPlan Review

New CrashPlanCrashPlan offers a myriad of options to backup your data. Backup to another local drive, another computer, a friends computer or online to CrashPlan’s servers. Add to that the ability to run on Windows, Macs and Linux machines and you have a backup service that appears to do it all.

CrashPlan is one of the highly-rated online backup services in the market and holds one of the most outstanding interfaces, and an unlimited number of storage plans for small business. Most of the online backup services only give remote server storage, but in addition to a sensibly priced paid online storage space option, CrashPlan lets you securely use any computer linked to the Internet or a local drive as a backup target. With an infinite storage plan, good security selections, and unlimited format-saving for cloud storage makes CrashPlan one of the best cloud-based backup solutions available.

Unlike most online backup providers, CrashPlan doesn’t only offer its own online storage as a backup location. You can also select a local drive, another computer of yours, or other user’s computer linked to the Internet. The other user will not have access to your files and folders because it has an encryption key.

Installation

Installation of CrashPlan varies depending on the operating system you are on. For Windows, users installation is pretty straightforward. Download the Windows application from the CrashPlan website and double-click the installation package to install. Mac installs are not much different. Linux installs require some command line work, but most Linux users are probably comfortable enough to handle getting it installed. The CrashPlan website does offer decent instructions to help people get the software installed.

Backing Up

Prior to beginning your backup, you will need to assign a backup destination. This is the CrashPlan cloud by default, but you can also add local drives for backup. The good thing is that local drives can be used to restore data more quickly than through the web or an internet connection. By setting a local drive, you still need to backup, meaning you will be protected twice.

After the software is installed it does automatically select the most common folders and files to start backing up. All you have to do it click the Start Backup button and the desktop client will start backing up to the CrashPlan Central servers. If you want more control over your backup you can choose what folders and files to backup and where to back them up to. You get to choose a destination including online, another computer, a local folder or even a friends computer that has Crashplan installed.

If you are backing up to CrashPlan servers and if you have a lot of data to backup you can seed the backup by getting a hard drive shipped to you and then sending it back. This can reduce your bandwidth use considerably and make your initial backup go much faster than just uploading it over the Internet.

With CrashPlan being able to upload data to different destinations, you can select which folders and files you want to backup to which destination. This is an interesting feature and could be useful if you want to make sure certain data is backed up to different places. Music to one place, videos to another etc. This could be useful if you want a different backup schedule for different files but it could add an extra layer of confusion for some users

Other backup features include items like automatic or scheduled backups, locked file support, encryption and compression and file versions.

Restoring

Restoring your data is just as important as backing it up. There is no point backing up your data if you can’t get it back. CrashPlan offers several ways to restore your data, through the client, through the web, and through a hard drive or DVD.

Restoring from local backup locations requires the desktop client to do so. The reason for this is because all local backups are encrypted and compressed so copying files out of the backup directly is not possible. While not a difficult thing to do it does mean you need to remember to download and install the desktop client if your computer crashes and you need to restore your data. It also means you need to remember your account password or you could have a harder time restoring even your local backups.

You can also have your restore shipped to you on a hard drive of a DVD. If you have to restore all of your files this can be a great option. Remember though this is at an additional cost, but can be well worth the cost if you have lost all your data.

Like most online backup services you can restore your data through the web. Simply log in to the website, click computers and select your files for your restore. There is a file size limit of 250mb per restore so if you have a large restore you could be at this for awhile.

Other Features

Backup to a Friend – This is something unique to CrashPlan. Have a friend that has tons of hard drive space and using CrashPlan you can be an off-site backup to your friend’s computer. You could create your own cloud backup and bypass the CrashPlan central server altogether and backup only to your friends.

Overall

I really want to like CrashPlan, it has a feature set that should set it high above many of the other online backup services, but there is something about the software that turns me off. I even did something I rarely do, I asked my wife to look at the software to see if she could easily backup some files. Her immediate reaction was confusion about the number of options to backup the files. I did not even try to ask her to restore any. For experienced computer users backing up using CrashPlan might be a great choice, but for the average person needing an easy to use the backup system to keep their photos, videos and files safe CrashPlan presents to many options.

I also had several problems with the software becoming unresponsive and causing my test machine to need a reboot. Not sure what the cause of the problem was but it was often enough that I decided to try running a Linux version instead. While running the free version on Linux I did not run into any of those issues so perhaps it was something unique to my Windows test system.

CrashPlan is a cloud backup service that creates backup sets that are greatly helpful in securing online backups to your important files. One of the top-favorite features of CrashPlan for business or small business is that it provides an unlimited backup.

There is no cap for CrashPlan unlimited. The only flaw is that CrashPlan plainly allows you to backup one computer, while other cloud services competitors can be used to backup unlimited computers. To fix this issue, you can use a single CrashPlan subscription to backup a lot of external hard drives as a backup solution.

CrashPlan is also available on mobile apps for Android and iOS that can be used to access files and folders.

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Take Control of CrashPlan Backups

CrashPlan is one of the only services that I know of that has their own ebook to help you get the most out of the service. The book is written by backup expert Joe Kissell and can be a great help in getting CrashPlan setup to take advantage of all of the features of the service. If you are thinking of subscribing to CrashPlan also plan on picking up the ebook to make sure you get the most out of your subscription.

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CrashPlan Screenshots

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22 Responses to CrashPlan Review

  1. Chris says:

    I’m giving Crashplan a go for their 30 day trial. The only thing holding me up from signing up for a subscription is network speeds. It was running quite quickly when I first registered, but its slowed down quite considerably no now – I guess as the server is loaded up with additional users. Can anyone who has been using the service for a while tell me if network speeds improve once the general profile of users on a server goes from ‘uploading’ to just ‘storing and updating changes to files’, reducing network utilisation on the server and hence possibly improving speeds again?

    Thanks.

  2. Falk says:

    I’m using Crashplan for Offsite-Backup of a FreeNAS-NAS at home – cheaper than an additional NAS at an offsite location for backup. With FreeNAS as Crashplan-Client, you can Backup multiple PCs or Macs with one Crashplan-Account: https://www.kadder.de/2014/08/freenas-backup-zu-crashplan/

  3. Pitaq says:

    I love CrashPlan. It’s inexpensive and it does a lot.

    I see a number of people complaining that it is slow. There are controls in the CrashPlan application that allow you to set the maximum amount of bandwidth that that is used. For some reason the limit seems to be set quite low. When I raised the bandwidth limit I found that CrashPlan would use as much as I chose to allow it to use.

  4. natong says:

    Crashplan offer no limit filetype and filesize.

    Can backup vmware. Can use backup set with priority.

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